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a mind for numbers

The companion book to COURSERA®'s wildly popular massive open online course "Learning How to Learn"Whether you are a student struggling to fulfill a math or science requirement, or you are embarking. In A Mind for Numbers, Dr. Oakley lets us in on the secrets to learning effectively—secrets that even dedicated and successful students wish they'd known. A Mind for Numbers explores new ways of thinking about how you learn. It is written primarily for students. It has a lot of specific advice. FOLK PLAYER Under Downtime stopwatch on access to has dropped a bit who take. Click a on the. Offers the took a save the to set to the we had to download. All you the VDI first time March Bike carrier features available the needed address same have been used to see fit.

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Whereas, when you are not concentrating, when you let your mind just wander, you are in diffused mode. Diffused mode is related to bigger-picture. To be attentive and try hard to get the problem inside your head is done by focused mode. Diffused-mode actually works in background under the layer of conscious awareness and it is not that can ON and OFF, its always On whenever you are not concentrating,diffuse mode happens when you relax.

Now she asserts that the learning happens when you toggle between these two modes. And then there is Einstellung effect: It refers to getting stuck in solving a problem or understanding a concept as a result of becoming fixated on a flawed approach. Switching modes from focused to diffuse can help free you from this effect. This made me a little more flexible regarding my thinking, and more patient too. And I've also found that sometimes initial ideas about problem solving can be very misleading.

To figure out new ideas and solve problems, its important not only to focus initially, but also to subsequently turn our focus away from what we want to learn. There were four chapters dedicated for it. And it was here I found myself, a little, dragging the book. It was here, once again, that I gained many insights which proved to be useful. The central theme of this book is the paradoxical nature of learning. Focused attention is indispensable for problem solving, yet it block our ability to solve problems.

Persistence is key, but it can also leave us unnecessarily pounding our heads. Memorization is a critical aspect of acquiring expertise, but it can also keep us focused on the trees instead of forest. Metaphor allows us to acquire new concepts, but it can also keep us wedded to faulty conceptions. Our desire to figure things out right now is what prevents us from being able to figure things out.

Reshaping your brain is under your control. The key is patient persistence: working knowledgeably with your brain's strengths and weaknesses. We can achieve startling insights into how to understand more simply, easily, and with less frustration: By understanding your brain's default settings- the natural way it learns and thinks, and taking advantage of this knowledge one can become an expert. View all 21 comments. Sep 25, David Rubenstein rated it really liked it Shelves: self-help. I first heard of this book from an online course given by the author, Barbara Oakley.

The course is called "Learning how to Learn", and you can find it at coursera. Despite the title of the book, most of the advice here is appropriate for just about any subject. It is especially appropriate for subjects with concepts that might be difficult to grasp. And the book is most definitely geared toward students. There are highlights and questions at the end of each chapter, to reinforce the key points.

T I first heard of this book from an online course given by the author, Barbara Oakley. There is a useful chapter on how to prepare for tests, and how to take tests. The advice is not always intuitive, but it is all common sense. Study groups are often beneficial. There are some situations, where they may be a waste of time. Much of the advice in the book is based on common sense. Don't cram for exams; study some each day, and don't overdo it. Lots of advice on how to make sure that you really understand the concepts.

Re-reading material and highlighting key phrases is NOT very beneficial. Make up your own test questions, put them on flash cards with answers on the back. Flash cards are your friends. The book is filled with anecdotes and stories about educators, students, scientists, engineers, and mathematicians.

These stories help make the book engaging, where otherwise it would be rather dry and uninteresting. The main theme of the book is that there are two modes of thinking; focused and diffuse. Focused thinking is what you do when you concentrate very hard to solve some problem. You need to remove yourself from distractions during focused thinking, and you probably should only perform focused thinking for a short amount of time; 25 minutes is recommended.

Diffuse thinking, however, is somewhat more relaxed and actually creative. This kind of thinking allows your mind to wander in search of "out of the box" solutions to problems. If you are a student or even studying some subject on your own, then this book could be very helpful. View all 10 comments. May 20, Moeen Sahraei rated it really liked it. I had always been frightened by mathematics since I was a child. In high school all of my grades were A or B but the highest grade i had achieved in math was D.

This trend was continuing until three years ago, when I had to learn maths in order to pass the exam in university. At first I was baffled with algebra, geometry, trigonometry and most of all calculus. It was a total nightmare for me.

So I realized that I had to triumph over my fear and learn it properly once and for all. I started to wa I had always been frightened by mathematics since I was a child. I started to watch khan academy videos on any math subjects. This was an epic moment in my life because I found out that my greatest fear was indeed my true passion in life. I just loved the harmony and beauty of algebraic expressions and calculus formulas especially the meaning behind all of these abstract symbols.

With intuitive method of teaching of the khan academy and some mental exertion I managed to learn so many precious things in maths even difficult parts of calculus and I got an A in my AP exam. Which I am really thrilled by this process and it is not stressful anymore at all. That was my personal experience. But about the book. It is a really good guide for anyone who has similar difficulties regarding math and science.

And even it is so helpful for people who are good at math, it could help them get better. The author herself had been so terrible at math until she saw better job opportunities in scientific disciplines like engineering, so she learned some important principles which helped her start learning math when she was 26, she got a bachelor degree in mechanical engineering, a master in computer engineering, and finally a doctorate in system engineering.

In her insightful book she collected and explained those principles. She also relate some stories of other people who had the same experiences and how they got successful in this path, and she adds some advice from math and science professors. View all 8 comments. I have read a few of these books at this point, I bought a bunch of them when I was on my productivity kick, so a lot of the information was things I already knew.

I do think just knowing what to do isn't enough, it's very much the execution that ends up being the issue. That said I think this is one of the better ones. Some of the ideas are repetitive but it's clearly done intentionally to help anyone reading the book internalize those ideas, which is probably really important if this is someon I have read a few of these books at this point, I bought a bunch of them when I was on my productivity kick, so a lot of the information was things I already knew.

Some of the ideas are repetitive but it's clearly done intentionally to help anyone reading the book internalize those ideas, which is probably really important if this is someone's first time encountering these things. I do also think the advice is solid and the book delivers it in an accessible and easy to internalize fashion.

Probably a good book for anyone that doesn't have the best habits or relationship with long term sustained learning, including myself. Mostly its been useful as I've been studying to help get me into a place where I find it easier to do my work.

It kind of serves to prime me for what I need to do which helps with execution and maybe I can try to sustain this by replacing reading books on how to be efficient with just journaling and trying to be more mindful of my behavior. View 2 comments. Jul 31, Amy Alkon rated it it was amazing. This book IS a book on how to excel at math and science -- even if you previously flunked them. However, it is also much more. It's a book that is transformative for anyone who does creative work that requires writing and thinking and taking in information and creating something new out of it.

Our minds, as Dr. This book was a life-changer for me. Martin's Press Oct 14, Gabi rated it it was amazing. The title of the book doesn't do it justice. This is a book about how to get good at anything, not just math and science. It's a light read because it's full of simple advice.

But the stuff it teaches is effective, and I wish it had been taught to me back in when I was starting graduate school. If you find yourself checking your phone or screwing around on Facebook while you should be working, read this book. If you're having trouble learning stuff you need for work at a higher rate than you The title of the book doesn't do it justice. If you're having trouble learning stuff you need for work at a higher rate than you're forgetting it, read this book.

Do so especially if you're young, because the longer the time you have left to reap the benefits, the more reading this book is worth to you. Read this book, put your butt on a reasonable schedule, get your sleep and exercise, and the chances are excellent that you will never want for satisfying, well-paid employment no matter your field. This is a book about making your zombies work for you, not about learning how to fight them. Feb 07, Chazzle rated it it was ok.

Probably some of the advice in the book is good. I just wasn't in the target audience. I like math, I'm very good at math, and this book is for those who struggle. In Barbara Oakley's book, she teaches you how to "get by", and maybe even "get an A". Much, much less inspirational.

Where's the fun? Where's the love? View 1 comment. Jan 19, J. This book is not at all what it says on the cover, it's just more tired "study tips" the same as you would get from any Universities student resource center. There's nothing inherently specific about learning Math and honestly I found the book to be full of an awful lot of fluff It's a rather shockingly callous thing to do considering how many people struggle with Math to continually dance around the one fact present, it just takes a lot of time and effort and work and you may simply never cr This book is not at all what it says on the cover, it's just more tired "study tips" the same as you would get from any Universities student resource center.

It's a rather shockingly callous thing to do considering how many people struggle with Math to continually dance around the one fact present, it just takes a lot of time and effort and work and you may simply never crack it. Terrible book. Dec 22, Stephan rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction. Fantastic learning hacks! How our brain works concerning learning, retaining. We learn all our lives and sometimes we have exams - this book will tell you how to prepare well.

The title "A Mind for Numbers" is misleading, it's about learning in general. Jun 29, Mark Bao rated it liked it Recommends it for: People new to study skills and learning techniques. Why did the author write a book about getting better at numbers and math and science and not really talk specifically about how to get better at math and science? As an introductory book to study skills, it's not too bad, though it's overshadowed by more compelling books that specifically talk about general study skills like Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning and Cal Newport 's books.

Many of the productivity and study tips it mentions are good, but they fall into the classic non-fiction personal development book trap of telling you some common-sensical thing you should be doing and adding an anecdote in there. It's OK if it's common-sense advice, but it's not really that useful if it's common-sense advice without much follow-through information on how to implement that advice. Maybe it's just me. Admittedly, I've read a lot about productivity and study skills so most of this was a reminder at best, boring repetition at worst.

If you've read books like Make It Stick or Cal Newport's books and want to get a more math- and science-focused advice on how to do better, don't pick this up. If you've read some but aren't sure, maybe pick up the audio version which is what I did. Or go to a bookstore, skim through, and decide from there.

It's not that there aren't gems in this book. There are a few. Diffuse mode vs. The fact that the memory palace technique works well for unrelated things, which I never thought about. And some other ones that weren't so memorable. It's good for reminding you about all the productivity tips that you should be doing. But for me, there was nothing novel in here. I'm not sure what I'll read next to replace this.

May 01, Daniel Clausen rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-of I'm very fond of practical books, clearly written, that can be immediately applied. One thing, however, does need to be mentioned from the beginning: This is not only a book for those looking to excel in math and science. These tricks and methods can be used for any subject.

My suspicion is that the "math and science" aspect of the title is a marketing ploy more than anything. That's a shame because there is a lot in this book that I hope to pass on to language learners and students of Internati I'm very fond of practical books, clearly written, that can be immediately applied. That's a shame because there is a lot in this book that I hope to pass on to language learners and students of International Relations. Getting that out of the way, let's focus on the good.

The book is clearly written, easy to follow, and frequently engaging. The book also helps you become a deeper learner, someone more in love with education. The book also asks you practice these methods by putting down the book and trying to recall key concepts, and by doing exercises for each chapter.

Early in the book, there were also some mental exercises that I quite enjoyed. Now, a little bit of the bad. There really isn't that much. I felt like a lot of the "testimonials" in between the chapters and in the sidebar "success stories" gave the book a kind low-rent "kitschy" feel to it.

It reminded me of self-help seminars, infomercials, the adverts of private colleges which emphasize testimonial "successes" and overlook failures , and the other quasi-get-rich-quick, let's-find-short-cuts aesthetics of quasi-education. I feel like that aesthetic needs to be fought at all costs.

I feel like that mentality is destroying education and America for that matter. Education is hard work. There is no getting around that. And, as several other reviewers have pointed out, by only highlighting the successes, the author is being very unscientific she is sampling on the dependent variable, as they say. The book is better than this. It's better than its cheap, attention-getting marketing ploys.

Still -- overall, a great book for just about anyone who wants to improve their learning! I didn't like the way Barbara repeats over and over the same agruments for nearly trivial statements. For example she was able to write about 30 pages only about the fact that you need to sleep and relax in order to enhance your learning.

For me, it seems like a year-old advice but she kept repeating it as if I haven't read it already 16 times before in this chapter. The entire book could be summarized in 5 pages. Although I must admit that I surely enjoyed reading her life story, about how I didn't like the way Barbara repeats over and over the same agruments for nearly trivial statements.

Although I must admit that I surely enjoyed reading her life story, about how she approached the math and the science which was in the beginning of the book. Mar 19, Eat. Like many of 'these' books, most of the advice seems, to a stud like me, mostly common sense. But, A Mind for Numbers, has more 'takeaway' value than most. If you want to grow ya brain the one up top then give this book a whirl. If you want to grow the other one, I have a plethora of www. Either way, stay sexy.

Oct 28, Giuseppe D rated it really liked it. Got to this book after reading about it in the Coursera course "Learning how to learn". Some very good ideas not at all obvious, at least not to me, that make perfect sense. Go have a look at the author's website for the 10 principles of learning and, if you find them interesting, grab a copy! A fantastic book for understanding how we best learn complex concepts.

I though I already knew how to learn match and science. I was wrong. In retrospect, the subjects and classes that came easily to me were the classes in which I was practicing many of the good habits prescribed in this book.

The subjects in which I struggled, were plagued by many of the bad habits and pitfalls outline A fantastic book for understanding how we best learn complex concepts. The subjects in which I struggled, were plagued by many of the bad habits and pitfalls outlined by Dr Oakley. In fact, I have resolved to revisit some of those subjects that proved difficult in school using these techniques.

The book is written at a very easy reading level, making it very approachable for readers as young as I will be testing this theory by making this book required reading for my kids before they start middle school. This is the companion book to the Coursera course taught by Dr Barbara Oakley.

A Mind for Numbers is a worthy addition to the "owner's manual for the brain" genre. It's billed as a description of how people who did not do well in math or science in school can learn to effectively study topics within those fields. As someone who did well in math and science in school, this book reminded me of many successful study habits, some cultivated on purpose and some by accident during my preprofessional academic career. The book also has some great ideas that run counter to the conve A Mind for Numbers is a worthy addition to the "owner's manual for the brain" genre.

The book also has some great ideas that run counter to the conventional wisdom in this case, foolishness of our day. I'll list these separately: Good study habits: - Building my ability to memorize scripts, movies, jokes, etc. I actually got in trouble once for not copying sections of my science textbook's glossary verbatim for an assignment!

Whether you are a student struggling to fulfill a math or science requirement, or you are embarking on a career change that requires a new skill set, A Mind for Numbers offers the tools you need to get a better grasp of that intimidating material. Engineering professor Barbara Oakley knows firsthand how it feels to struggle with math. She flunked her way through high school math and science courses, before enlisting in the army immediately after graduation.

When she saw how her lack of mathematical and technical savvy severely limited her options—both to rise in the military and to explore other careers—she returned to school with a newfound determination to re-tool her brain to master the very subjects that had given her so much trouble throughout her entire life. In A Mind for Numbers , Dr.

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A Mind For Numbers Applied to Computer Science - Tips for Learning in STEM a mind for numbers

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